Renewable Energy Makes Up 63% of Global New Generation Capacity

  • Renewables account for 63% of global new capacity generation according to International Renewable Energy Agency’s (IRENA) latest generation capacity update.
  • The decade-long trend of strong growth in renewable energy capacity continued in 2018 with global additions of 171 gigawatts (GW).
  • The annual increase of 7.9% was bolstered by new additions from solar and wind energy, which accounted for 84% of the growth.
Globally, total renewable energy generation capacity reached 2,351 GW at the end of last year – around a third of total installed electricity capacity.
Oceania witnessed the fastest growth with a 17.7% rise in 2018. Asia was second with a 11.4% rise followed by Africa with 8.4% growth. Nearly two-thirds of all new power generation capacity added in 2018 was from renewables, led by emerging and developing economies.

In the Middle East, with its high levels of solar potential, supply grew by 7.1 per cent or an extra 1.3 GW, to reach a total of around 20 GW installed capacity, while the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states are planning an additional 7 GW of new power generation from renewable sources by the early 2020s.

Renewable power generation capacity is measured as the maximum net generating capacity of power plants and other installations that use renewable energy sources to produce electricity. For most countries and technologies, the data reflects the capacity installed and connected at the end of the calendar year. Data has been obtained from a variety of sources, including IRENA’s questionnaire, official national statistics, industry association reports, other reports and news articles.

Author: GBA News Desk

Source: IRENA

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